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ACM HT'99 Course Program

Courses will run for one day only - Monday, February 22, and have been organized in three tracks:


Structure

TRACK 1 –STANDARDS

course code:.1

XML: A Technical and Strategical Overview
David G. Durand,  Boston University and Dynamic Diagrams Inc., and   Steve J. DeRose -  Brown University, USA

course code: 2

The Web as a Collaborative, Writeable Medium: An Introduction to the IETF WebDAV Standard
Jim Whitehead, University of California, Irvine

TRACK 2 –DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT,  and EVALUATION METHODS

course code: 3

Web Site Information Architecture: Planning and Designing Information Collections on the Web
Paul  Kahn, Dynamic Diagrams and Rhode Island School of Design, USA

course code: 4

Hypermedia and Web Development Methods
David Lowe and Andrew Bucknell, Computer Systems Engineering,   University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

TRACK 3 - AUTHORING and IMPLEMENTATION

course code: 5

Authoring Hypermedia: It Takes Time!
Lynda  Hardman, CWI, The Netherlands

course code: 6

Filling Up On Java
Ian Smith, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, USA

[Afternoon]

TRACK 1 –STANDARDS

course code: 7

Supporting Advanced Hypertext Functionality with XLink
David G. Durand – Boston University and S.J. DeRose, Brown University, USA

course code: 8

The Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL)
L. Hardman , R. Rutledge , CWI, The Netherlands

TRACK 2 –DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT,  and EVALUATION METHODS

course code: 9

Mapping Web Sites: Planning Diagrams to Site Maps
Paul Kahn, Dynamic Diagrams and Rhode Island School of Design, USA

course code: 10

Usability Evaluation of Hypermedia (WWW and CD-ROMs)
F. Garzotto and  M. Matera,  Politecnico di Milano, Italy
F. Costabile, University of Bari, Italy
A. De Angeli, University of Trieste, Italy

TRACK 3 - AUTHORING and IMPLEMENTATION

course code: 11

Extending Information Systems with Hypertext (on and off the Web)
Michael Bieber, New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA


MONDAY MORNING

TRACK 1 –STANDARDS

course code: M1.1

David G. Durand,  Boston University and Dynamic Diagrams Inc., and  Steven J. DeRose -  Brown University, USA

XML: A Technical and Strategical Overview

XML has become a very hot topic in the last year, and new applications are still being found. This course will provide an introduction to XML. It will give you a technical overview about the language itself, as well as information about its applications (especially as they relate to hypertext). We will also review its goals and the process of its creation, and discuss its place in the group of related standards efforts, such as Xlink, RDF, XSL, and DOM.

Target audience: Anyone who thinks they need a technical and strategic overview of XML.

Level: Intermediate

About the Instructors

Steven J. DeRose is Chief Scientist at Inso Corporation, and Visiting Chief  Scientist at the Brown University Scholarly Technology Group. He is Editor of the Xlink specification, and has taken part in the XML, TEI, and HyTime  standards efforts. He was a founder of Electronic Book Technologies and architect of the Dynatext product. He was head of the TEI working group on Hypertext representation, and wrote the TEI hypertext specification with David.

David Durand is a Senior Analyst for the information design studio Dynamic Diagrams, and a PhD degree candidate at Boston University. He is a co-author, with Steve, of "Making Hypermedia Work: A User's Guide to HyTime." He has taken part in the Text Encoding Initiative, XML, HyTime, and and WebDAV standards efforts,  and has been working with and on structured document representations and hypertext for the last 15 years.

For further information please contact: dgd@cs.bu.edu

course code: M1.2

The Web as a Collaborative, Writeable Medium: An Introduction to the IETF

WebDAV Standard

Jim Whitehead, University of California, Irvine

At present, the Web is primarily a read-only medium, providing excellent support for browsing content, and limited support for authoring new content. WebDAV is a standard developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for extending the Web to make it a writable, collaborative medium. This tutorial will give an overview of the WebDAV Distributed Authoring protocol, and extensions for advanced collections and versioning.  Key features of WebDAV will be explained in detail, including facilities for overwrite prevention, manipulating properties (meta-data), and namespace management. Existing, publicly available WebDAV client and server applications will be discussed, including their techniques for using WebDAV.

Target audience:  Web application developers, hypertext protocol researchers, internet service providers, CSCW researchers

Level: novice-to-intermediate (the course assumes some knowledge about the hypertext transfer protocol -HTTP, although a brief overview of this protocol will be given during the course).

About the Instructor

Jim Whitehead is the Chair of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) working group on Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV), and is a co-author on all major specifications produced by this working group. Jim is also a Ph.D. student at the University of California at Irvine, where he has published articles on his research interests in web protocols, open hypermedia (the Chimera system), hypertext versioning, and software architecture. Jim has a MS in Information and Computer Science from U.C. Irvine, and a BS in Electrical Engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

For further information please contact: ejw@ics.uci.edu

TRACK 2 –DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT,  and EVALUATION METHODS

course code: M2.1

Web Site Information Architecture: Planning and Designing Information Collections on the Web

Paul  Kahn, Dynamic Diagrams and Rhode Island School of Design, USA

What is Information Architecture and why is it so important in planning a web site? Just as the architect coordinates the engineering, aesthetic, and functional needs of a physical building, the information architect works to develop the structural foundation and functional specifications of a web site. This seminar will present the methodology developed by Dynamic Diagrams for planning and executing a sound information architecture for web sites, with special attention to large collections such as encyclopedias and magazines. The visual logic of the web site design is then built upon the structural logic of the architecture. The result should be a site that is easy to use, easy to maintain, and flexible enough to grow as the content expands.

Target audience: web site developers and strategic planners

Level: beginner/intermediate

About the Instructor

Paul Kahn is president of Dynamic Diagrams (d/D), an information design firm specializing in the mapping of knowledge and the presentation of information on the computer screen. Since its founding in 1991, d/D has worked with major companies in North America and Europe, creating analysis reports, visualization of information collections, web site architecture and design, and user interface design. Paul teaches interactive design at Rhode Island School of Design.

For further information please contact: Paul@DynamicDiagrams.com

course code: M2.2

Hypermedia and Web Development Methods

David Lowe and Andrew Bucknell, Computer Systems Engineering,   University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

Much current hypermedia, and especially Web development is currently very ad-hoc. Not only is the development carried out without the benefit of a well-defined methodology, but the development process itself is often ill-defined and ad hoc. Although the application of processes from other disciplines (such as graphic design or software engineering) can help this situation, Web development projects have some characteristics which make the process inherently different, and effective project management becomes critical. The primary aim of this course is to give web developers an understanding of development processes and methodologies which can be applied in adopting a more structured approach to managing projects. The course explores how hypermedia development differs from other forms of development, what types of processes can be most profitably adopted, and the methodologies which are available to support the analysis and design of hypermedia applications and Web sites.  We shall consider methods such as OOHDM, RMM, DIVA, EORM, Thuring's framework, ERMIA, etc., as well as looking at models such as HDM, and tools such as ODMTool, RMCase, VIKI, and Aquanet.

Target audience:  Web project management, application analysts and designers, content experts, and Web masters

Level:  intermediate.

About the Instructors

Dr. David Lowe  is a Senior Lecturer, and Head of Computer Systems Engineering at the University of Technology, Sydney. David's teaching is divided between undergraduate software engineering subjects, postgraduate hypermedia and web development, and commercial short courses.  His research has emphasised the need to consider process in developing hypermedia, and this has carried through into a recently published book, coauthored with Prof. Wendy Hall, titled "Hypermedia and the Web: An Engineering Approach" (Wiley).  This research has resulted in numerous publications and has attracted significant research funding. David has also been involved in extensive collaboration with industry, and undertaken considerable consulting.

Andrew Bucknell is a Research Assistant in Computer Systems Engineering at the University of Technology, Sydney. He has been involved in research projects investigating hypermedia development processes and information management for hypermedia systems. He has also been involved in preparing postgraduate courses and commercial short courses relating to hypermedia development. He has been involved in significant industrial collaboration on research projects.

For further information please contact: dbl@ee.uts.edu.au

TRACK 3 - AUTHORING and IMPLEMENTATION

course code: M3.1

Authoring Hypermedia: It Takes Time!

Lynda  Hardman, CWI, The Netherlands

The construction of a coherent hypermedia presentation composed from its constituent parts is a non-trivial task. To explore the requirements of a hypermedia authoring system, we describe a selection of both research and commercial authoring systems. These provide examples of the types of support that can be given to authors, and how this support can be provided in practice. We differentiate four authoring paradigms and discuss their advantages and disadvantages for editing features of a multimedia document model. In addition to these user interface aspects we describe in more detail ways of visualizing and editing hypermedia documents.  Many of our examples will be taken from the GRiNS authoring environment, designed and implemented by  the CWI group.

Target audience: project managers and  strategic planners (and anywho who wishes to purchase a hypermedia authoring system, since the course  can provide him or her with insights as to the suitability of the approach used by the system); hypermedia implementors  (who should consult the presenter after the course if they wish more technical information than the course itself provides).

Level:  Intermediate

About the Instructor

Lynda Hardman is an established researcher in the hypertext field.  She was introduced to hypertext in a commercial setting where she became the product manager for the Guide hypertext system (1986). Her research was initially concerned with the usability of hypertext documents, and then led to the development of a hypermedia document model (the Amsterdam Hypermedia Model).  Authoring systems are needed to create such documents, and she has been closely involved with design of the GRiNS authoring environment.  She was a member of the W3C SYMM working group which developed SMIL.

For further information please contact: Lynda.Hardman@cwi.nl

course code: M3.2

Filling Up On Java

Ian Smith, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, USA

Do you know how to write a Java program but want to know more about how to leverage Java for building real applications and systems? Then this tutorial is for you! It is designed for the beginner or intermediate Java developer who wants to improve his or her use of Java and gain a more full understanding of the directions Java is moving.  (Developers with no Java experience might find the tutorial useful, but the instructor assumes that participants have a working knowledge of the Java language.)  The tutorial is divided into three primary sections.  The first section is a survey of Java Application Programming Interfaces, including up to the minute details (straight from Silicon Valley). As far as possible, this section will be tailored to the individual interests of the participants.  The second section will be a discussion of techniques for improving the quality and reliability of Java code.  This section will focus on specific guidelines and techniques for producing more  bulletproof" Java software; it will include some design exercises to be done by tutorial participants. In the final section, the participants and the instructor will work through the design and implementation a "server-based" Web application.  This section is designed to give students a feel for leveraging the multitude of Java technologies in a real-world application.

Level: Intermediate

Target Audience: Beginning and intermediate Java developers (familiarity with the Java language required)

About the Instructor

Ian Smith is member of the research staff at Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) who works in PARC's Computer Science Lab.  He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1998.

His research interests are the areas of computer supported cooperative work, programming methodologies and tools, computer-human interaction, and user interface software. He has published numerous academic papers in ACM conferences such as CSCW, Multimedia, CHI, UIST, and Hypertext—including sharing the Englebart Best Paper Award at Hypertext '96 with David Balcom and Nick Sawheny.

For further information please contact: iansmith@parc.xerox.com


MONDAY AFTERNOON

TRACK 1 –STANDARDS

course code: A1.1

Supporting Advanced Hypertext Functionality with XLink

David G. Durand – Boston University and S.J. DeRose, Brown University, USA

XML is starting to revolutionize the way data and documents are represented on the web, by bringing years of text-encoding experience to bear on the problem. XLink promises to do the same thing for hypertext linking. Xlink provides much more powerful link representation and addressing features than HTML. This tutorial will explain how the current XLink draft works, and will present an overview of progress on this important emerging standard.

Target audience:  Anyone who has a basic knowledge of XML, of hypertext linking and abstractions, and wants to see how it can be used to support advanced hypertext functionality.

Level: intermediate

About the Instructors

Steven J. DeRose is Chief Scientist at Inso Corporation, and Visiting Chief Scientist at the Brown University Scholarly Technology Group. He is Editor of the Xlink specification, and has taken part in the XML, TEI, and HyTime  standards efforts. He was a founder of Electronic Book Technologies and architect of the Dynatext product. He was head of the TEI working group on Hypertext representation, and wrote the TEI hypertext specification with David.

David Durand is a Senior Analyst for the information design studio Dynamic Diagrams, and a PhD degree candidate at Boston University. He is a co-author, with Steve, of "Making Hypermedia Work: A User's Guide to HyTime." He has taken part in the Text Encoding Initiative, XML, HyTime, and and WebDAV standards efforts,  and has been working with and on structured document representations and hypertext for the last 15 years.

For further information please contact: dgd@cs.bu.edu

course code: A1.2

The Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL)

L. Hardman , R. Rutledge , CWI, The Netherlands

SMIL is a W3C recommendation, approved in June 1998 and quickly gaining popularity, which provides a vendor-independent, declarative language for hypermedia presentations on the Web.  With at least three players currently available, and with more and more presentations being posted on the Web, SMIL promises to do for interactive multimedia what HTML did for hypertext: bring it into every living room with an easy-to-author, readily implementable format and easily accessible players for it. Its official specification is available at http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-smil.

The goal of the tutorial is to explain the concepts that form the basis of the SMIL language and to provide sufficient detail on the language itself so that participants can create their own simple presentations.  Participants will also understand the underlying issues of temporal and spatial layout and the complexity of creating links within multimedia.

Target audience: hypermedia content developers, researchers on hypermedia standards and models.  Familiarity with basic HTML constructs and tools such as Macromedia Director or Authorware  is desirable, though not necessary.

Level: Intermediate

About the Instructor

Lynda Hardman is an established researcher in the hypertext field.  She was introduced to hypertext in a commercial setting where she became the product manager for the Guide hypertext system (1986). Her research was initially concerned with the usability of hypertext documents, and then led to the development of a hypermedia document model (the Amsterdam Hypermedia Model).  Authoring systems are needed to create such documents, and she has been closely involved with design of the GRiNS authoring environment.  She was a member of the W3C SYMM working group which developed SMIL.

Lloyd Rutledge  is a researcher at CWI, Amsterdam where he researches thecreation and processing of adaptive hypermedia using international standards such as HyTime, DSSSL, MHEG-5 and, most recently, SMIL. He received his Doctor of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts Lowell in 1996. Lloyd Rutledge has served on the HyTime development committee, the SMIL development committee, and has been an instructor in Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

For further information please contact: Lynda.Hardman@cwi.nl

TRACK 2 –DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT,  and EVALUATION METHODS

course code: A2.1

Mapping Web Sites: Planning Diagrams to Site Maps

Paul Kahn, Dynamic Diagrams and Rhode Island School of Design, USA

Today's web site is a combination of a publication, a software application, and navigation system. The teams that build these sites include marketing, editorial, and software engineering. Building such a complex product requires both verbal and visual analysis. The team needs a clear vision of what they will build, as well as a visual analysis of what they have created. This seminar review the concept of mapping with key historical examples of visual representations of space, followed by examples of planning diagram for building large web sites, and hand-made site map for navigating web sites. We will conclude with demonstrations and comparison of the latest software tools and techniques for web developers, web masters and visitors to visualize web sites.

Target audience: web site developers and strategic planners

Level: intermediate

About the Instructor

Paul Kahn is president of Dynamic Diagrams (d/D), an information design firm specializing in the mapping of knowledge and the presentation of information on the computer screen. Since its founding in 1991, d/D has worked with major companies in North America and Europe, creating analysis reports, visualization of information collections, web site architecture and design, and user interface design. Paul teaches interactive design at Rhode Island School of Design.

For further information please contact: Paul@DynamicDiagrams.com

course code: A2.2

Usability Evaluation of Hypermedia (WWW and CD-ROMs)

F. Garzotto and  M. Matera,  Politecnico di Milano, Italy
F. Costabile, University of Bari, Italy
A. De Angeli, University of Trieste, Italy

This course will provide participants with systematic methods for evaluating hypermedia  usability in a cost effective way. We will discuss both inspection techniques (performed by expert evaluators only) and empirical testing techniques (involving end users in usability experiments), and will present an approach which helps evaluators achieve the best results from the integration of these methods. We will propose a set of evaluation patterns that make inspection more systematic and better organized,  and help to exploit the output of inspection to better focus the empirical testing. We will finally describe how to design different types of user experiments, and how to analyze their results.

The various concepts will be exemplified by analysing (through running demos) a number of off-line hypermedia (e.g., on CD-ROMs) as well as WWW sites, and by discussing their  usability.

Target audience:  hypermedia evaluators and developers; project managers;  electronic publishers;  researchers on hypermedia design and usability evaluation.

Level: intermediate - advanced

About the Instructors

Franca Garzotto is Associate Professor at the Department of Electronics and Information, Politecnico di Milano. She has a Degree in Mathematics from the University of Padova and a Ph.D. in Computer Science  from Politecnico di Milano.  She has been active in the hypertext and multimedia since 1988, focusing on design models and methodologies, authoring tools, usability evaluation, and museum hypermedia.  She has been involved, as a reasearcher or a technical consultant, in many European projects in the above fields. Franca Garzotto has been member of the program committee of many editions of ACM conferences on Hypertext and  on Multimedia, served as Program Chair of the International  Workshop on "Hypermedia Design" (Montpellier–FR, 1995) and of the First International  Workshop on "Evaluation and Quality Criteria for Multimedia Applications" (S. Francisco - CA, 1995).

Maristella Matera is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Electronics and Information, Polytechnic of Milan, where she is a member of the Hypermedia Open Center. Since her graduation in Computer Science at the University of Bari, Italy, in 1994, she has been awarded several fellowships for supporting her research work at Italian and foreign institutions. In 1995 she worked at CNUCE Institute of CNR, Pisa, Italy. During 1996 she visited the GVU Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, US. Her research interests span visual interfaces for databases, intelligent multimedia presentation systems, hypermedia modelling, usability engineering.

Maria F. Costabile received the Laurea degree in Mathematics at the Universita' della Calabria. Since 1989 she has been  associate professor at the Department of Computer Science of the University of Bari, Italy,and visiting scientist in several European and US universities. Her current interests include theory of visual languages, visual interfaces, visual languages for querying databases, human-computer interaction, usability of multimedia systems, user models.  She is in the Steering Committee of the Conferences on Advanced Visual Interfaces (AVI) and she served as program co-chair of AVI'96 and AVI'98. She is member of ACM, IEEE, AICA, IAPR. She is chairing the Italian Chapter of ACM SIGCHI.

Antonella De Angeli  has a PhD Experimental Psychology from University of Trieste, where she has been working in the Department of Psychology since 1992. Her research topics are primarily concerned with methodological issues in evaluating Human-Computer Interaction, with particular attention towards multimodal and multimedia interfaces. She has spent several months in foreign research centers, such as the Center for Human-Computer Communication (CHCC), Department of Computer Science, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science & Technology (Portland, USA), and LORIA, (Laboratoire Lorrain de Recherche en Informatique et ses Applications, Nancy, France) working on the Language and Dialogue Team.

TRACK 3 - AUTHORING and IMPLEMENTATION

course code: A3.1

Extending Information Systems with Hypertext (on and off the Web)

Michael Bieber, New Jersey Institute of Technology, USA

This course studies providing hypertext functionality to information systems that typically do not support or take advantage of hypertext. These include most applications found in the scientific, education and business worlds.  We demonstrate how to find possibilities for linking in these applications, teaching a method that helps developers discover the interrelationships in their application (many of which frequently are overlooked), understand their  system much more deeply,  and implement much richer systems.  We focus on the kinds of links that can be generated automatically at run-time, as many real- world applications generate their content dynamically.

This approach is especially important for developers reengineering applications for the World Wide Web, as most Web applications incorporate a fraction of the hypertext links and functionality that they could., but it also enriches the design of new applications off the Web. We also discuss ways to implement hypertext in primarily-nonhypertext applications. 

The course includes a hands-on exercise applying these techniques. Attendees should come away from this course armed with a technique for analyzing existing and new applications to determine where hypertext links and navigation can enrich their user's interaction.  Users will have a new way to think of their everyday applications, i.e., in terms of their intra- and inter-relationships.

Level: intermediate - advanced

Target audience:  anyone interested in utilizing hypertext within application systems that normally do not employ hypertext.

About the Instructor

Michael Bieber is Assistant Professor of Information Systems at the New Jersey Institute of Technology.   He has been performing hypermedia  research since 1987, when he embarked on a research path in automating  hypermedia support for analytical information systems.  Dr. Bieber is  an active member of ACM SIGWEB.

For further information, please contact:  bieber@njit.edu

Submissions for this category are now closed.